Professor Eric Laithwaite Magnetic Demo 1975 (After he met John Searl years prior)

Professor Eric Laithwaite Magnetic Demo 1975 (After he met John Searl years prior)

Published on Jan 23, 2013 TheRealVerbz2

The illusion of the “wave” traveling at 10 minutes 10 seconds of this video is similar to Walter Russell’s quote “Light doesn’t travel.”

Take note that Eric Laithwaite didn’t get involved with magnets or gyroscopes until he met with Professor John Searl. Eric’s friend went to a couple of John Searl’s lectures and was very impressed. He told Eric about John Searl’s work but Eric didn’t believe him at the time. So Eric met with John Searl himself… and left equally impressed. Years later, Eric Laithwaite invented the “mag-lev” system and started working with Gyroscopes and shooting ball bearings/ aluminum rings across his lab and down hallways.

When Eric was with the BBC he made a few of these video demonstrations. He was going to do another presentation regarding John Searl’s technology, but a couple days before he was to present the material, Eric was fired from the BBC. He then went back to studying the microscopic array and ordering of butterfly wings.

The explanations in this video follow right along with John Searl’s SEG and the way the rollers behave. Eric Laithwaite does not address Searl’s uniquely magnetized materials and their differences of behavior compared to the magnets he is demonstrating (which are the only magnets known to 99% of people)

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